Health and Wellness

Remembering to Take Care of Yourself

In the classroom, WashU seeks to train your mind. But outside of school, you still need to take care of your body. Exercise and recreation can keep you in shape, while on-campus medical care can treat your body — and mind — if the need arises.

Featured Undergrad

Getting well. Feeling better. Learning habits of good mental and emotional health. Helping others. Students do all these and more on the way to well-being.

Zane Norton

Zane Norton

Being ready for medical school and a career as a physician has meant jumping into healthcare now for Zane Norton.

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Information for Graduate Student Survivors of Relationship and Sexual Violence

Find information for graduate and professional student survivors of relationship and sexual violence, including resources on and off campus.

Information for LGBTQIA Survivors of Relationship and Sexual Violence

Washington University is dedicated to providing well-trained, culturally competent support for LGBTQIA survivors of sexual and relationship violence.

Information for Male Survivors of Relationship and Sexual Violence

Read information for male survivors of relationship or sexual violence.

Information for Survivors of Relationship and Sexual Violence

Learn about the aftermath of sexual assault and/or relationship violence, and ways to take care of yourself.

Leaders in Interpersonal Violence Education (LIVE)

LIVE is a student group that seeks to educate the Washington University community surrounding topics of interpersonal violence.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Many survivors experience trauma-related problems and feelings for a significant amount of time after a sexual assault.

Rape Myths and Facts

Rape myths are damaging and false beliefs about rape and sexual assault.

Rape Trauma Syndrome

Rape trauma syndrome (or RTS) is related to post-traumatic stress disorder but is more specific to sexual assault.

Associated Departments